Saturday, May 23, 2020

High Risk Sexual Behavior At North Carolina - 1231 Words

It is known that a lot of adolescents engage in different sexual intercourse before they even graduate from high school. A study that was conducted in 2014 by the Department of Psychology at the University of North Carolina stated how this type of high risk sexual behavior is the reason as to why these kinds of actions have resulted in more than 9 million new cases involving sexually transmitted diseases, and 8,300 new cases of human immunodeficiency viruses, which include things such as HIV. These results continued between adolescents and new coming adults. The study also found that if you have a well-established open communication about the different sexual health issues with your partner that promotes safer sexual†¦show more content†¦The different procedures that were used to conduct this study were surveys, which were administered via computer which assisted self-interviews. These computers were located in a classroom setting with about approximately 30 students. The pr ocedures that CASI executed were shown to reduce biases and increase validity, which would allow the study to be conducted once again and receive similar results. The participants were recruited from three low-income high schools in the southeastern United States. All of the students in 7th and 8th grade were recruited except for those who were in special education classroom. From these participants who were considered for the study, only 82.4% of them provided a consent form concerning the study. From those 900 students, 32 of them were absent from school that day or simply declined participation. The analysis was conducted in five steps. The first step conducted a variety of descriptive analysis to determine what percentage of the youth in the study had discussed sexual health topics with their partners, their parents, and their best friends. The second step was to analyze how the different conversations differed depending on the person to whom they were discussion these topics. For example the difference between how you spoke to your parents versus your friends. Thirdly the study examined the differences in the number of sexual health topics. The fourth way was by examining whether or not discussion of the sexual health topics

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Importance of the Magna Carta to the US Constitution

The Magna Carta, meaning â€Å"Great Charter,† is one of the most influential political documents ever written: it is seen by many modern political scientists as the fundamental document for many of the governing laws of the west, including the United States. Originally issued in 1215 by King John of England as a way of dealing with his own political crisis, the Magna Carta was the first governmental decree establishing the principle that all people—including the king—were equally subject to the law.   Key Document in U.S. Political Foundations In particular, the Magna Carta had a significant impact on the American Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and the constitutions of various U.S. states. Its influence is also reflected in the beliefs held by eighteenth-century Americans that the Magna Carta affirmed their rights against oppressive rulers. In keeping with colonial Americans general distrust of sovereign authority, most early state constitutions included declarations of rights retained by individual citizens and lists of protections of those citizens from the powers of the state government. Due in part to this conviction to individual liberty first embodied in the Magna Carta, the newly-formed United States also adopted the Bill of Rights. The American Bill of Rights Several of the natural rights and legal protections enumerated in both the state declarations of rights and the United States Bill of Rights descend from rights protected by Magna Carta. A few of these include: Freedom from unlawful searches and seizuresThe right to a speedy trialA right to a jury trial in both criminal and civil casesProtection from loss of life, liberty, or property without due process of law The exact phrase from the 1215 Magna Carta referring to â€Å"due process of law† is in Latin, but there are various translations. The British Library translation reads: â€Å"No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions, or outlawed or exiled, or deprived of his standing in any other way, nor will we proceed with force against him, or send others to do so, except by the lawful judgement of his equals or by the law of the land.† In addition, many broader constitutional principles and doctrines have their roots in America’s eighteenth-century interpretation of the Magna Carta, such as the theory of representative government, the idea of a supreme law, a government based on a clear separation of powers, and the doctrine of judicial review of legislative and executive acts. Journal of the Continental Congress Evidence of the influence of the Magna Carta on the American system of government can be found in several key documents, including the Journal of the Continental Congress, which is the official record kept of the Congresss deliberations between May 10, 1775, and March 2, 1789. In September and October 1774, the delegates to the first Continental Congress drafted a Declaration of Rights and Grievances, in which the colonists demanded the same liberties guaranteed to them under â€Å"the principles of the English constitution, and the several charters or compacts.† They demanded self-government, freedom from taxation without representation, the right to a trial by a jury of their own countrymen, and their enjoyment of â€Å"life, liberty, and property† free from interference from the English crown. The Federalist Papers Written by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay, and published anonymously between October 1787 and May 1788, the Federalist Papers were a series of eighty-five articles intended to build support for the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. Despite the widespread adoption of declarations of individual rights in state constitutions, several members of the Constitutional Convention generally opposed adding a bill of rights to the federal Constitution. In Federalist No. 84, published during the summer of 1788, Hamilton argued against the inclusion of a bill of rights, stating: â€Å"Here, in strictness, the people surrender nothing; and as they retain everything they have no need of particular reservations.† In the end, however, the Anti-Federalists prevailed and the Bill of Rights—based largely on the Magna Carta—was appended to the Constitution in order to secure its final ratification by the states. The Bill of Rights as Proposed As originally proposed to Congress in 1791, there were twelve amendments to the constitution. These were strongly influenced by the state of Virginia’s Declaration of Rights of 1776, which in turn incorporated a number of the protections of the Magna Carta. As a ratified document, the Bill of Rights included five articles directly reflecting these protections: Protection from unreasonable searches and seizures (4th),  Protection of rights to life, liberty, and property (5th),  Rights of accused persons in criminal cases (6th),  Rights in civil cases (7th), and  Other rights kept by the people (8th).   History of the Magna Carta King John I (also known as John Lackland, 1166–1216) ruled England, Ireland and sometimes Wales and Scotland between 1177–1216. His predecessor and brother Richard I had spent much of the kingdoms wealth on the crusades: and in 1200, John himself had lost lands in Normandy, ending the Andevin Empire. In 1209, after an argument with Pope Innocent III  over who should be the archbishop of Canterbury, John was excommunicated from the church. John needed to pay money to get back in Popes good graces, and he wanted to wage war and get back his lands in Normandy, so as sovereigns were wont to do, he increased already-heavy taxes on his subjects. The English barons fought back, forcing a meeting with the king at Runnymede near Windsor on June 15, 1215. At this meeting, King John was coerced into signing the Great Charter which protected some of their basic rights against royal actions. After some modifications, the charter known as the magna carta libertatum (great charter of liberties) became part of the law of the land of England in 1297 under the reign of Edward I.  Ã‚   Key Provisions of the Magna Carta Following are some of the key items that were included in the 1215 version of the Magna Carta: Habeas corpus, known as the right to due process, said that free men could only be imprisoned and punished after lawful judgment by a jury of their peers.Justice could not be sold, denied, or delayed.Civil lawsuits did not have to be held in the kings court.The Common Council had to approve the amount of money that vassals had to pay instead of having to serve in the military (called scutage) along with any aid that could be requested from them with only three exceptions, but in all cases, the aid had to be reasonable. This basically meant that John could no longer tax without the agreement of his Council.If the King wanted to call the Common Council, he had to give the barons, church officials, landowners, sheriffs, and bailiffs 40 days notice that included a stated purpose for why it was being called.For commoners, all fines had to be reasonable so that their livelihood could not be taken away. Further, any offense that a commoner was said to have committed had to be sworn to by go od men from the neighborhood.Bailiffs and constables could not appropriate peoples possessions.London and other cities were given the right to collect customs.The king could not have a mercenary army. In feudalism, the barons were the army. If the king had his own army, he would have the power to do what he wanted against the barons.Inheritances were guaranteed to individuals with the amount of what today we would call inheritance tax being set in advance.As stated previously, the king himself had to follow the law of the land. Up until the Magna Carta’s creation, British monarchs enjoyed supreme rule. With the Magna Carta, the king, for the first time, was not allowed to be above the law. Instead, he had to respect the rule of law and not abuse his position of power. Location of Documents Today There are four known copies of the Magna Carta in existence today. In 2009, all four copies were granted UN World Heritage status. Of these, two are located at the British Library, one is at Lincoln Cathedral, and the last is at Salisbury Cathedral. Official copies of the Magna Carta were reissued in later years. Four were issued in 1297 which King Edward I of England affixed with a wax seal. One of these is currently located in the United States. Conservation efforts were recently completed to help preserve this key document. It can be seen at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., along with the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights.   Updated by Robert Longley Resources and Further Reading Documents from the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention, 1774 to 1789. Digital Collections. Library of Congress.The Federalist Papers. Congress.gov.  Howard, A. E. Dick. Magna Carta: Text and Commentary, 2nd ed. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1998.Linebaugh, Peter. The Magna Carta Manifesto: Liberties and Commons for All. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009Magna Carta 1215: Transcript in English and Latin. The British Library.  Hamilton, Alexander. Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered. Federalist Papers 84. New York: McLeans, July 16–August 9, 1788Vincent, Nicholas. The clauses of Magna Carta. The British Library, March 13, 2015.  The Virginia Declaration of Rights. National Archives.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The visit summary Free Essays

The story opens with the town of Guellen (which literally means â€Å"excrement†) preparing for the arrival of famed millionairess Claire Zachanassian. The town is In a state of disrepair, and the residents are suffering considerable hardship and poverty. They hope that Claire, a native of the small town, will provide them with much- needed funds. We will write a custom essay sample on The visit summary or any similar topic only for you Order Now Alfred Ill, the owner of Guellen’s general store and the most popular man In town, was Claire’s lover when they were young, and agrees with the Mayor that the task of convincing her to make a donation should fall to him. As the town athers at the railway station to prepare for Claire’s arrival, they are met with an unexpected surprise when Claire steps off of an earlier train. She Is grand, grotesque, and fantastic, and Is accompanied by two henchmen, her husband, a butler, and two eunuchs, along with a coffin, a caged black panther, and various pieces of luggage. She begins a flirtatious exchange with Ill, and they promptly revlslt their old haunts: Petersen’s Barn and Konrad’s Village Wood. Ill finds her as delightful as ever, though they are both now in their sixties and significantly overweight. Claire draws Ill’s attention to her prosthetic leg and artificial hand. After settling into the Golden Apostle Hotel, Claire joins the rest of the town, who have gathered outside for a homecoming celebration. A band plays, gymnasts perform, and the Mayor gives a speech. Claire takes the opportunity to announce that she will make a donation of one million dollars, half for the town and half to be shared among the families. The townspeople are overjoyed, but their happiness is dampened when Claire’s Butler steps forward to reveal her condition. The Butler was once the Lord Chief Justice of Guellen, and had overseen the paternity suit that Claire had brought against Ill in 1910. In the suit, Ill had produced two false witnesses (who have since been transformed into Claire’s eunuchs), and the court had ruled in his favor. Ill went on to marry Matilda, who owned the general store, and Claire moved to Hamburg and became a prostitute. She declares to the townspeople that she has come to Guellen to prove that Justice can, indeed, be bought. Her donation is conditional on Ill’s death. When the Mayor refuses, the town cheers in support, but Claire states rather minously, â€Å"I’ll wait. Ill feels generally confident about his status in the town. However, as time passes, he begins to feel troubled about their growing discontent, and then increasingly fearful as he begins to notice the proliferation of new yellow shoes on the feet of the townsmen, and the fact that everyone seems to be purchasing especially expensive items on credit. He goes to see the Pol iceman to demand that he arrest Claire for having threatened his life, but the Policeman tells him that the threat is nonsense. Ill then turns to the Mayor, who echoes similar sentiments. Both figures are armed, because Claire’s black panther has escaped from his cage and is prowling about the town. This only feeds Ill’s fear, since â€Å"my black panther† was Claire’s pet name for him In their youth. He runs to see the Priest, but the Priest seems to be turning away from him as well, as he effectively Ignores Ill’s fears and Instead draws attention to the magnificent new church bell. Slowly, the standard of living in the town rises, even though the townspeople continue to assure Ill that he is safe. Claire then receives the news that her black panther has been Klllea, ana sne nas a Tuneral song played In Its memory. In an effort to escape, Ill heads to the railway station, but finds that, strangely, the entire town is gathered there. They ask him where he is going, and he says that he is planning to move to Australia. They wish him well, again assuring him that he has nothing to fear in Guellen, but Ill grows increasingly nervous nonetheless. The train arrives, but he decides not to board, believing that someone will stop him anyway. Paralyzed, he collapses in the crowd, crying, â€Å"I’m lost! After some time passes and Claire weds a ew husband in the Guellen Cathedral, the Doctor and the Schoolmaster go to see her and explain that the townspeople have run up considerable debts since her arrival. The Schoolmaster appeals to her sense of humanity and begs her to abandon her desire for vengeance and help the town out of the goodness of her heart. She reveals to them that she already actually owns all of properties in the town, and t hat she is the reason the businesses have been shut down and caused stagnation and poverty for the citizens. The Doctor and the Schoolmaster are aghast at this revelation. In the meantime, Ill has been pacing the room above the general store, his terror growing as the townspeople buy more and more expensive products on credit. News reporters, having received word of Claire’s imminent wedding, are everywhere, and they enter the store to get the scoop on Ill, having heard that he was Claire’s lover back in the day. The Schoolmaster, drunk, tries to inform the press about Claire’s cruel proposal, but the townspeople stop him. Finally Ill descends the stairs, surprised at the hubbub, but quiet. The reporters clear the room when they hear hat Claire has Just divorced the man she has Just married, and has found a new lover. After the confusion has cleared, the Schoolmaster and Ill have an honest discussion. The Schoolmaster explains that he is certain that Ill will be killed, and admits that he will ultimately Join the ranks of the murderers. Ill calmly states that he has accepted his guilt, and acknowledges that the town’s suffering is his fault. The Schoolmaster leaves, and Ill is confronted by the Mayor, who asks whether Ill will accept the town’s Judgment at that evening’s meeting. Ill says that he will. The Mayor hen suggests that Ill make things easier on everyone and shoot himself, but Ill refuses, insisting that the town must go through the process of actually Judging and then killing him. Ill goes for a ride in his son’s newly-purchased car, accompanied by his wife, Matilda, and his daughter, both of whom are wearing new outfits. As they drive through Konrad’s Village Wood, Ill says that he is going to go for a walk through the woods before heading to the town meeting. His family continues on to the movie theater. In the woods, Ill comes across Claire, who is walking with her newest husband. She asks her husband to leave so that she and Ill can speak privately. They reminisce about the past, and make plans for the future. Claire tells Ill that she plans to take his body away in the coffin to a mausoleum in Capri that overlooks the Mediterranean. She also tells Ill that she has never stopped loving him, but that over time her love has grown into something monstrous. The town meeting is flooded with press, and the town publicly announces their acceptance of Claire’s donation. They then go through the formality of a vote, which is unanimous, and the Mayor states that they have Ill to thank for their new-found wealth. The press is then ushered out of the auditorium to enjoy refreshments. The doors are locked, and the lights are dimmed. The Priest crosses Ill, and he is killed by the townsmen. Just as a reporter reappears In tne au01torlum, tne Doctor announces tnat II I nas oleo Trom a neart attack. The reporters gather, and declare that Ill has died from Joy. Claire examines the corpse, gives the Mayor his check, and leaves the town with Ill’s body in the coffin that she brought with her when she arrived in Guellen. Claire boards the train at the railway station, and the visit comes to an end. How to cite The visit summary, Papers

The visit summary Free Essays

The story opens with the town of Guellen (which literally means â€Å"excrement†) preparing for the arrival of famed millionairess Claire Zachanassian. The town is In a state of disrepair, and the residents are suffering considerable hardship and poverty. They hope that Claire, a native of the small town, will provide them with much- needed funds. We will write a custom essay sample on The visit summary or any similar topic only for you Order Now Alfred Ill, the owner of Guellen’s general store and the most popular man In town, was Claire’s lover when they were young, and agrees with the Mayor that the task of convincing her to make a donation should fall to him. As the town athers at the railway station to prepare for Claire’s arrival, they are met with an unexpected surprise when Claire steps off of an earlier train. She Is grand, grotesque, and fantastic, and Is accompanied by two henchmen, her husband, a butler, and two eunuchs, along with a coffin, a caged black panther, and various pieces of luggage. She begins a flirtatious exchange with Ill, and they promptly revlslt their old haunts: Petersen’s Barn and Konrad’s Village Wood. Ill finds her as delightful as ever, though they are both now in their sixties and significantly overweight. Claire draws Ill’s attention to her prosthetic leg and artificial hand. After settling into the Golden Apostle Hotel, Claire joins the rest of the town, who have gathered outside for a homecoming celebration. A band plays, gymnasts perform, and the Mayor gives a speech. Claire takes the opportunity to announce that she will make a donation of one million dollars, half for the town and half to be shared among the families. The townspeople are overjoyed, but their happiness is dampened when Claire’s Butler steps forward to reveal her condition. The Butler was once the Lord Chief Justice of Guellen, and had overseen the paternity suit that Claire had brought against Ill in 1910. In the suit, Ill had produced two false witnesses (who have since been transformed into Claire’s eunuchs), and the court had ruled in his favor. Ill went on to marry Matilda, who owned the general store, and Claire moved to Hamburg and became a prostitute. She declares to the townspeople that she has come to Guellen to prove that Justice can, indeed, be bought. Her donation is conditional on Ill’s death. When the Mayor refuses, the town cheers in support, but Claire states rather minously, â€Å"I’ll wait. Ill feels generally confident about his status in the town. However, as time passes, he begins to feel troubled about their growing discontent, and then increasingly fearful as he begins to notice the proliferation of new yellow shoes on the feet of the townsmen, and the fact that everyone seems to be purchasing especially expensive items on credit. He goes to see the Pol iceman to demand that he arrest Claire for having threatened his life, but the Policeman tells him that the threat is nonsense. Ill then turns to the Mayor, who echoes similar sentiments. Both figures are armed, because Claire’s black panther has escaped from his cage and is prowling about the town. This only feeds Ill’s fear, since â€Å"my black panther† was Claire’s pet name for him In their youth. He runs to see the Priest, but the Priest seems to be turning away from him as well, as he effectively Ignores Ill’s fears and Instead draws attention to the magnificent new church bell. Slowly, the standard of living in the town rises, even though the townspeople continue to assure Ill that he is safe. Claire then receives the news that her black panther has been Klllea, ana sne nas a Tuneral song played In Its memory. In an effort to escape, Ill heads to the railway station, but finds that, strangely, the entire town is gathered there. They ask him where he is going, and he says that he is planning to move to Australia. They wish him well, again assuring him that he has nothing to fear in Guellen, but Ill grows increasingly nervous nonetheless. The train arrives, but he decides not to board, believing that someone will stop him anyway. Paralyzed, he collapses in the crowd, crying, â€Å"I’m lost! After some time passes and Claire weds a ew husband in the Guellen Cathedral, the Doctor and the Schoolmaster go to see her and explain that the townspeople have run up considerable debts since her arrival. The Schoolmaster appeals to her sense of humanity and begs her to abandon her desire for vengeance and help the town out of the goodness of her heart. She reveals to them that she already actually owns all of properties in the town, and t hat she is the reason the businesses have been shut down and caused stagnation and poverty for the citizens. The Doctor and the Schoolmaster are aghast at this revelation. In the meantime, Ill has been pacing the room above the general store, his terror growing as the townspeople buy more and more expensive products on credit. News reporters, having received word of Claire’s imminent wedding, are everywhere, and they enter the store to get the scoop on Ill, having heard that he was Claire’s lover back in the day. The Schoolmaster, drunk, tries to inform the press about Claire’s cruel proposal, but the townspeople stop him. Finally Ill descends the stairs, surprised at the hubbub, but quiet. The reporters clear the room when they hear hat Claire has Just divorced the man she has Just married, and has found a new lover. After the confusion has cleared, the Schoolmaster and Ill have an honest discussion. The Schoolmaster explains that he is certain that Ill will be killed, and admits that he will ultimately Join the ranks of the murderers. Ill calmly states that he has accepted his guilt, and acknowledges that the town’s suffering is his fault. The Schoolmaster leaves, and Ill is confronted by the Mayor, who asks whether Ill will accept the town’s Judgment at that evening’s meeting. Ill says that he will. The Mayor hen suggests that Ill make things easier on everyone and shoot himself, but Ill refuses, insisting that the town must go through the process of actually Judging and then killing him. Ill goes for a ride in his son’s newly-purchased car, accompanied by his wife, Matilda, and his daughter, both of whom are wearing new outfits. As they drive through Konrad’s Village Wood, Ill says that he is going to go for a walk through the woods before heading to the town meeting. His family continues on to the movie theater. In the woods, Ill comes across Claire, who is walking with her newest husband. She asks her husband to leave so that she and Ill can speak privately. They reminisce about the past, and make plans for the future. Claire tells Ill that she plans to take his body away in the coffin to a mausoleum in Capri that overlooks the Mediterranean. She also tells Ill that she has never stopped loving him, but that over time her love has grown into something monstrous. The town meeting is flooded with press, and the town publicly announces their acceptance of Claire’s donation. They then go through the formality of a vote, which is unanimous, and the Mayor states that they have Ill to thank for their new-found wealth. The press is then ushered out of the auditorium to enjoy refreshments. The doors are locked, and the lights are dimmed. The Priest crosses Ill, and he is killed by the townsmen. Just as a reporter reappears In tne au01torlum, tne Doctor announces tnat II I nas oleo Trom a neart attack. The reporters gather, and declare that Ill has died from Joy. Claire examines the corpse, gives the Mayor his check, and leaves the town with Ill’s body in the coffin that she brought with her when she arrived in Guellen. Claire boards the train at the railway station, and the visit comes to an end. How to cite The visit summary, Papers

Friday, May 1, 2020

Analysis Of The Astronomers Wife Essay Example For Students

Analysis Of The Astronomers Wife Essay Analysis of The Astronomers WifeIn the Astronomers Wife by Kay Boyle, something as simple as aconversation with a plumber about a stopped elbow is enough to trigger anawakening in Mrs. Katherine Ames. When Mrs. Ames realized that the plumber wastalking about something she understood (the stopped elbow), she realized thather marital problems were not the result of a division betwwen the sexes;instead, she realized that some men, like the plumber, are as practical as sheis, and that some other men, like her husband, scorn people like her becausethey are intellectually inclined. Previous to this discovery, Katherine did notrealize that there were different kinds of men, and therefore she did notrealize that she and her husband were mismatched. Furthermore, in her awakening,Mrs. Ames also discovers that she, like the plumber, occupies as valuable aplace in society as the astronomer, for she does the dirty work to free peoplelike her husband to have time to think and to discover. The scene in question takes place after Mrs. Ames has already noticed thatthe plumber has a few physical characteristics that match her own (such asblond hair), and she is talking to him as he descends into the earth. The scenebegins immediately after the plumber says I think something has stopped theelbow, because this phrase was one of the few things that a man has ever saidthat Mrs. Ames has understood. After the plumber has descended into the groundbefore the scene, Mrs. Ames is the only one left. She spends the entireduration of this scene sitting on the grass, silently thinking and revealing herthoughts to the audience. During her course of thinking, Mrs. Ames makes the important discovery thatthere is a whole race of practical people like herself, men and women alike. She knew that when her husband spoke of height, having no sense of it, shecould not picture it nor hear, but strangely enough, when another man whohappened to be a plumer spoke of his work, madness in a daily shape, as elbowstopped, she saw clearly and well. Mrs Ames finally realized during thesethoughts that these were two men with two different ways of life, and perhapsher way of life suited the plumbers more than the astronomers, in that she toocould identify only with daily concerns. The division between people in hermind was no longer just between men and women; it was now the working and thethinking, those who had always gone up, and others who went down, like thecorporeal being of the dead. She now recognized that there were both physicaland spiritual human beings, herself and the plumber being the former, and herhusband being the latter. The theme is revealed in the way that these two classes of people, thetoilers and the thinkers, react to the world. The people who work with theirhands, when they see weeds springing up, do not move to tear them up fromlife. In other words, people like Mrs, Ames, upon recognizing something thatoccupies the same position in society that they do, such as the often ill-regarded weed, do not feel compelled to destroy it. Weeds, like the workers,although considered ugly, are as necessary for nature to be in balance as themore beautiful flower is. However, people like the astronomer could balanceand divide, weed out, destroy. This indicates that people with lofty ambitions,like the astronomer, do not regard the common people as necessary for the worldto run smoothly, and would rather obliterate them. The astronomer does notrealize that by unclogging pipes and performing other such chores, those peoplehave allowed him to be free to think about large-scale problems. Interactionbetween the tw o types of people is necessary, whether either one realizes it,for the world to function. .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d , .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d .postImageUrl , .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d , .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d:hover , .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d:visited , .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d:active { border:0!important; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d:active , .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u15a9b39567f828189231e788705e870d:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: What Is Science EssayThe Astronomers Wife is an excellent short story that brings out theoften forgotten point that both the practical people and the ambitious dreamersare important for each others survival. While Mrs. Ames perhaps could neverget along without her husband, it was no fault of her own that she didnt. Sheprovided a comfortable existance for the astronomer so that he would be free todo his work, and the marriage would have been happier if Mr. Ames recognizedall that she had done, and had considered her lifestyle a valid one. Of coursean understanding was never reached, because otherwise the author would not havebeen able to illustrate the similar conflicts tha t exist in todays society sowell.

Thursday, March 5, 2020

My Hero essays

My Hero essays Using a fictional character, a historical figure, or a contemporary person, talk about "heroes or heroism." When thinking of heroes to write on I the first and number one hero in my life is my father. My dad is the second oldest of five kids, he was raised in a traditional family where my grand father worked and my grand mother stayed home and raised the kids. I attribute his values and standers to way my father was raised. The reason he is my hero is because I want to be just like him. He loves his wife whom he has been married to for the past 35 years; he is very strong in his faith (Mormon) and loves all five of his children. I am the black sheep in the family, I smoke, drink, and have relationships with different women. Despite all of my faults he loves me the same as the rest of my siblings whom are living the standards of our church (which I remain in active in.) Our relationship grows stronger as time goes on and I get older and under stand more of how life works. We do several fix-it projects together; works on is his garden in the summer and the basement in the winter. I now I can go to my father with any problem I have in my life, he will listen and he is always there to help me out in what ever way he can if he is able to do so. When referring to my father in conversations, everyone whom knows him respects him for who he is and the way he treats others. I have never heard my father swear in my life and he has never treated my mother with any disrespect. He raised his children with a stern hand but never lost his calm cool with us kids. My dad was the enforcer in the house, when I had done something wrong and he punished my he would always say  ¡Chad, this hurts me more than it does you. ¡ Only now as an adult do I under stand what that meant and the incredible love my father had for all of us kids. I come from a very close family, all of us siblings have to see or talk to each o ...